Study Online English

Idioms

How to Speak Like a Native English Speaker – IELTS Speaking Preparation

 

In this video, you are going to hear a conversation between two native English speakers. It will help you to learn new vocabulary and phrasal verbs, such as: finish off, look forward to, take care of, look after, without a doubt etc.

For people preparing for IELTS, it is really helpful because a lot of the questions I ask are used in IELTS but also in normal everyday conversations. Listen to the way I ask Katy questions to keep the conversation going because a lot of examiners do the same. They want you to express yourself as confidently as possible.

The transcript is below with links and explanations of the phrasal verbs, vocabulary and phrases that we used in the conversation.

Happy learning!

Transcript:

  • Hello, this is Amy, from Study Online English, and you’re going to hear some more conversations with native English speakers.
  • This is my lovely friend, Katy.
  • This is Katy, who we bought the birthday present for.
  • Did you like your handbag, Katy?
  • Oh, I loved it.
  • Fantastic, and how was your day?
  • Did you have a busy day at work?
  • Busy day at work, finishing off the month, and just getting ready now for Easter holidays  Finishing off the month means finishing all the things you need to do such as, the policies or accounts. To finish something off: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/finish-sth-off
  • And do you want to tell everybody what you do?
  • I’m an insurance agent, nothing too exciting, but hey. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/insurance-agent
  • Katy is one of the sportiest people I know. Katy, what are your hobbies? What have you been doing this week? Sportiest: A sporty person enjoys sports and is good at it. Sportiest is the superlative
  • Well, what have I been doing this week? I’ve been walking, cycling, and doing some obstacle training, as I quite enjoy Spartan races, obstacle races.
  • Can you explain what Spartan Race is?
  • Spartan Race is basically between eight and 10 kilometres and about twenty obstacles. Obstacle: an object that you have to go around or over : something that blocks your path
  • I wouldn’t be able to do that.
  • Oh, I’m sure you could. I’m certain you could
  • I wouldn’t mind doing a mini one, one day. One day I’ll come with you.
  • Exactly, why not?
  • So who introduced you to it?
  • Well, a friend of my sisters actually introduced me to it last year.
  • She said to me, “Why don’t you train for that?” and I was like,(my reaction) I wasn’t quite sure at the time, because I actually had a friend that did it a few years back(a few years ago) and I was like no, no, no, that’s definitely not for me, a bit too intense. And I did one race, and that was it, I was hooked.(addicted)
  • Do many girls do it? (Many for countable)
  • Quite a few actually. It’s getting really popular, believe it or not.
  • Do you think some people like to train toward something?
  • I think it’s important to have goals sometimes.
  • Have an objective.
  • When you’ve got your nine to five job, or you’re routine, I think it’s just nice, sometimes, to disconnect and give yourself something to look forward to.
  • Look forward to: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/look-forward-to-sth
  •  Apart from the normal routine of things.
  • Apart from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/apart?q=apart+from
  • Yeah, do you think a lot of people are quite sporty here, or do you think it’s a mixture?
  • Oh, definitely. No, I think around here, especially a lot. And I think in general now people are taking more care of their health, you know physically, people are looking after themselves more. Taking care: to pay attention. Look after: you do what is necessary to keep yourself/someone/something healthy and safe or in good condition.
  • – Eating healthier. I just think people are more aware (more conscious) of it now than they used to be. (they were before)
  • Yeah, it’s over what, (how much time) the last 10 years people have become…
  • I think so, definitely. – Yeah, because we live in Spain at the moment, but I’m leaving sadly.
  • We’re going to miss you lots.
  • I’m not going for long. I’m going to go to Ireland for a little bit, to Southern Ireland. And visit my family, and just spend some time there for a couple of months and see if I like it.
  • What do you think people like doing here in their spare time?
  • I think, round here especially, cycling is huge.(huge can for used as very popular) I mean, a lot of people cycle, a lot of people run as well. Things like that. A lot of outdoor activities more so, because the weather’s so good here.
  • Yeah, there’s a lot of people who come and train here…(train for cycling races)
  • Oh, they’re from all over Europe. Yeah, they come and train.
  • They’re cyclist aren’t they? Why do you think that is?
  • I think because of the great weather conditions, more than anything. And it’s prepared for that.
  • It’s got a lot of mountains as well, haven’t we?
  • We have, and that we have for training purposes.
  • Yeah, it’s a bit annoying sometimes though. (however)
  • Yes, I do agree with that, even though I like to cycle, hey.
  • Because there’s just so many of them.
  • How often do you see your friends, how often do you see everyone? (everyone is used when the person knows who you are talking about)
  • Oh, I definitely see my friends a few times during the week.(few: more than two)
  • What, for the odd coffee? Odd: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/odd
  • For a coffee, when I’ve got a bit of free time. Coffee, maybe a walk after work, and things like that.
  • Yeah, and how often do you go back to the UK?
  • To be honest, not very often.
  • Do you ever miss the UK?
  • Not that much, I miss my family and friends that I’ve got there, but the quality of life, I love it here in Spain.
  • I must be crazy to go back.
  • I think she is. Are you not going to miss it here?
  • I am going to miss it, but I feel like a need a change.
  • But have you noticed that there’s more… it’s more cosmopolitan everywhere now?
  • I think so.
  • You notice there’s lots of different nationalities everywhere.
  • Definitely, without a doubt.
  • Without a doubt: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/doubt?q=without+%28a%29+doubt
  • So if you liked this video, please like. Or?
  • Please subscribe.
  • Thank you!

What are your hobbies?

 

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Driving me mad!

diving me mad

Drive someone up the wall

To make someone extremely angry.

  • My flat-mate is driving me up the wall.

Driving me round the bend

To make someone very angry, especially by continuing to do something annoying.

  • You’re driving me round the bend with your constant complaining.

 driving me mad twoDrive someone mad

To feel irritated

  • I wish that person would stop kicking my chair it’s driving me mad.

 

These are common idioms that you will hear a lot when you are with native English speakers when they want to express that they are feeling irritated or annoyed about something.

 

 

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Idioms

Winter Idioms

Hello everyone, It’s absolutely freezing outside! There is snow, really strong cold winds, rain and ice on the roads most mornings it’s really feeling like winter now!!!!

london idiomsI personally love this time of year, the woolly hats and gloves, big warm coats and the cold air on my face. One of my favourite things to do is to watch the snow fall while sitting inside with a big mug of cocoa it’s my favourite time of year.

In English as you have probably noticed we love our idioms. Here are a few winter themed idioms for you to learn. Although they all seem very winter like you can use them all year round.

 Left out in the cold

Feel excluded, forgotten or ignored.

  •  I felt left out in the cold, the group weren’t very friendly or welcoming.

 Snowball effect

It is when a situation starts small and gets built up increasing in power and momentum as it grows.

snowmen idiom

A snowball effect can be negative or positive.

  • After the company promoted the new line of products, there was a snowball effect, the company got bigger and bigger.

Tip of the iceberg

 Only the part of something that can be easily observed, but not the rest of it, which isice idioms hidden. (Referring to the fact that the majority of an iceberg is below the surface of the water.)

  •  The problems that you see here now are just the tip of the iceberg. There are numerous disasters waiting to happen.

Walking on thin ice

 The expression is used to describe a situation of possible danger or risk, where the “ice” could break at any time and the person treading or walking on it could fall in.  It usually implies that the walker knows they’re putting themselves at risk, but is continuing nevertheless.

  • He knew when he handed in his project late that he was walking on thin ice,  it had become a regular occurrence with that professor.

Put something on ice

To delay something.

  • Both projects have been put on ice until they can be paid for.

Cold shoulder

Be intentionally unfriendly to someone.

– Are you talking to your brother?

– No, I am giving him the cold shoulder until he apologises.

Have or get cold feet.

Suffer from a loss of nerve or confidence about something you had planned to do.

  • I’m worried she might get cold feet before she goes on the date with Philip.

Freeze up

Become anxious and unable to move or speak.

  • I think I will freeze up before I do the bungee jump.

Left out in the cold

Feel excluded, forgotten or ignored.

  • I felt left out in the cold, the group weren’t very friendly or welcoming.

Whether it’s winter where you are or it’s bright and sunny. I wish you a great day!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rings a bell.

rings a bell

The way English people speak.

 

As you have probably already noticed in English we use a lot of idioms and expressions. In this short video, I will explain what  rings a bell means.

 

Someone called Flor called me yesterday, her name rings a bell but I cant remember who she is?

Do you ever find it hard remembering people? I know I do!

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Learn how to speak English like a native English person.

Cost an arm and a leg.

In this video I am going to explain what cost an arm and a leg means. In English we use a lot of idioms. Idioms are expressions that can´t be understood just by listening to them, they are expressions that you just have to learn to understand. They are ideal because sometimes the best way to express how you feel is by using expressions or idioms. I learnt various Spanish expressions when I started learning Spanish, I use them all the time now.

One of my favorites is: No te compliques la vida, which means don´t complicate your life. There is´nt such an expression in English, I love it.

Check out my Facebook page as well, its full of useful tips from me and other language schools that I think are helpful.

Follow the Facebook link below.

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Speak English like a native using the Idioms: Keep your eye on the ball and On the ball.

Do you want to learn how to speak and use English like a native English speaker?

 

Check out the video below on how to use the idioms:

  • On the ball
  • Keep your eye on the ball

 

These idioms can be used in everyday English as well as in sport.

Sign up for tips on how to improve your English by following this link https://www.studyonlineenglish.com/homepage/

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What does Piece of Cake mean?

Idiom Piece of Cake?

In this Video you will learn what the idiom Piece of Cake means.

 

Learning idioms helps you learn English more effectively because people use idioms a lot!!! I know I do!

In all languages including your mother tongue ( the first language you learn as a child) we describe some situations for which an idiom is the best way to express what you would like to say.

I hope you enjoyed my explanation of Piece of Cake  and the view of Portichol and part of Javea.

If you would like to learn some helpful tips on how to improve your English, subscribe to my news letter!

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