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Idioms

Winter Idioms

Hello everyone, It’s absolutely freezing outside! There is snow, really strong cold winds, rain and ice on the roads most mornings it’s really feeling like winter now!!!!

london idiomsI personally love this time of year, the woolly hats and gloves, big warm coats and the cold air on my face. One of my favourite things to do is to watch the snow fall while sitting inside with a big mug of cocoa it’s my favourite time of year.

In English as you have probably noticed we love our idioms. Here are a few winter themed idioms for you to learn. Although they all seem very winter like you can use them all year round.

 Left out in the cold

Feel excluded, forgotten or ignored.

  •  I felt left out in the cold, the group weren’t very friendly or welcoming.

 Snowball effect

It is when a situation starts small and gets built up increasing in power and momentum as it grows.

snowmen idiom

A snowball effect can be negative or positive.

  • After the company promoted the new line of products, there was a snowball effect, the company got bigger and bigger.

Tip of the iceberg

 Only the part of something that can be easily observed, but not the rest of it, which isice idioms hidden. (Referring to the fact that the majority of an iceberg is below the surface of the water.)

  •  The problems that you see here now are just the tip of the iceberg. There are numerous disasters waiting to happen.

Walking on thin ice

 The expression is used to describe a situation of possible danger or risk, where the “ice” could break at any time and the person treading or walking on it could fall in.  It usually implies that the walker knows they’re putting themselves at risk, but is continuing nevertheless.

  • He knew when he handed in his project late that he was walking on thin ice,  it had become a regular occurrence with that professor.

Put something on ice

To delay something.

  • Both projects have been put on ice until they can be paid for.

Cold shoulder

Be intentionally unfriendly to someone.

– Are you talking to your brother?

– No, I am giving him the cold shoulder until he apologises.

Have or get cold feet.

Suffer from a loss of nerve or confidence about something you had planned to do.

  • I’m worried she might get cold feet before she goes on the date with Philip.

Freeze up

Become anxious and unable to move or speak.

  • I think I will freeze up before I do the bungee jump.

Left out in the cold

Feel excluded, forgotten or ignored.

  • I felt left out in the cold, the group weren’t very friendly or welcoming.

Whether it’s winter where you are or it’s bright and sunny. I wish you a great day!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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